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J Pediatr. 2014 Jan;164(1):89-92. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.09.019. Epub 2013 Oct 13.

Nausea predicts delayed gastric emptying in children.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Comer Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL. Electronic address: Hjericho@peds.bsd.uchicago.edu.
  • 2Department of Pediatrics, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago IL.
  • 3Department of Biostatistics Research Core, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago IL.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess whether the gastroparesis cardinal symptom index (GCSI), or any individual symptom, is associated with delayed gastric emptying in children, and to assess understanding of symptoms associated with delayed gastric emptying.

STUDY DESIGN:

Fifty children (36 F), 5-18 years of age, undergoing gastric emptying scintigraphy (GES) at Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago, Illinois, completed Likert-type GCSI and symptom comprehension questionnaires. Correlation of GES results (normal or abnormal) with questionnaire results using the Wilcoxon rank sum test.

RESULTS:

Seventy percent of subjects had a normal GES. Children reported understanding most terms of GCSI (average score 2.59, range 0-3). The GCSI was not associated with delayed gastric emptying. Nausea was associated with delayed gastric emptying only (numerical P = .04, word P = .02). Results were not altered when poorly understood terms were excluded.

CONCLUSIONS:

The GCSI is not associated with delayed gastric emptying in children. Lack of association does not seem to be related to lack of understanding. Nausea alone was the only symptom that showed an association with delayed gastric emptying on GES.

Published by Mosby, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

BMI; Body mass index; CMH; Children's Memorial Hospital of Chicago; GCSI; GES; Gastric emptying scintigraphy; Gastroparesis cardinal symptom index

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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