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Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2014;58(1):61-70. doi: 10.1128/AAC.01751-13. Epub 2013 Oct 14.

Optimization of pyrrolamides as mycobacterial GyrB ATPase inhibitors: structure-activity relationship and in vivo efficacy in a mouse model of tuberculosis.

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1
AstraZeneca India Pvt Ltd., Hebbal, Bangalore, India.

Erratum in

  • Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2014 Aug;58(8):4993-4.

Abstract

Moxifloxacin has shown excellent activity against drug-sensitive as well as drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), thus confirming DNA gyrase as a clinically validated target for discovering novel anti-TB agents. We have identified novel inhibitors in the pyrrolamide class which kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis through inhibition of ATPase activity catalyzed by the GyrB domain of DNA gyrase. A homology model of the M. tuberculosis H37Rv GyrB domain was used for deciphering the structure-activity relationship and binding interactions of inhibitors with mycobacterial GyrB enzyme. Proposed binding interactions were later confirmed through cocrystal structure studies with the Mycobacterium smegmatis GyrB ATPase domain. The most potent compound in this series inhibited supercoiling activity of DNA gyrase with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of <5 nM, an MIC of 0.03 μg/ml against M. tuberculosis H37Rv, and an MIC90 of <0.25 μg/ml against 99 drug-resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. The frequency of isolating spontaneous resistant mutants was ∼10(-6) to 10(-8), and the point mutation mapped to the M. tuberculosis GyrB domain (Ser208 Ala), thus confirming its mode of action. The best compound tested for in vivo efficacy in the mouse model showed a 1.1-log reduction in lung CFU in the acute model and a 0.7-log reduction in the chronic model. This class of GyrB inhibitors could be developed as novel anti-TB agents.

PMID:
24126580
PMCID:
PMC3910769
DOI:
10.1128/AAC.01751-13
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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