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Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Nov;17(11):1495-500. doi: 10.5588/ijtld.13.0017.

Changes in vitamin C and oxidative stress status during the treatment of tuberculous meningitis.

Author information

1
Institute of Biochemistry, Medical Faculty, University of Pristina, Kosovska Mitrovica, Serbia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tuberculosis (TB) is associated with oxidative stress and is traditionally linked to vitamin C deficiency.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the time course of the oxidative stress marker, malondialdehyde (MDA), and vitamin C status during the clinical treatment of tuberculous meningitis (TBM).

METHOD:

MDA and vitamin C reduction/oxidation (redox) status were spectrophotometrically measured at admission and during hospital treatment in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from 27 TBM patients and 20 controls.

RESULTS:

Baseline CSF and serum MDA levels in TBM patients were higher than in controls (both P < 0.05), and remained elevated throughout the study. CSF MDA steadily increased from baseline 0.66 ± 0.24 mol/l to 1.02 ± 0.33 μmol/l at the end of the sixth week of treatment (P < 0.05), and then returned to baseline levels. Baseline CSF and serum total vitamin C were lower in TBM patients than in controls, but were soon normalised. CSF and serum ascorbate, reduced/oxidised vitamin C ratios and ascorbate CSF/serum ratio were markedly decreased in TBM patients (P < 0.05), and showed no improvement during treatment.

CONCLUSION:

These results indicate increased local and systemic oxidative stress, accompanied by impaired redox status, but not total vitamin C deficiency, which persisted during conventional clinical treatment of TBM.

PMID:
24125457
DOI:
10.5588/ijtld.13.0017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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