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Trends Microbiol. 2013 Nov;21(11):568-74. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2013.08.006. Epub 2013 Oct 9.

Pathogen recognition receptor crosstalk in respiratory syncytial virus sensing: a host and cell type perspective.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V4, Canada; Child & Family Research Institute, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4H4, Canada.

Abstract

Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection in young children, immunocompromised adults, and the elderly. The innate immune response plays a pivotal role in host defense against RSV, but whether severe outcomes following RSV infection result from excessive or poor innate immune recognition remains unclear. Recent research suggests a situation in which crosstalk between families of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) occurs in a cell type-dependent manner. The current challenge to empower novel therapeutic approaches and vaccine development is to confirm the role of the individual receptors in RSV pathogenesis in humans.

KEYWORDS:

innate immunity; pathogen recognition receptors; pathogenesis; respiratory syncytial virus

PMID:
24119913
PMCID:
PMC4848032
DOI:
10.1016/j.tim.2013.08.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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