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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2013 Nov;61(11):1943-7. doi: 10.1111/jgs.12496. Epub 2013 Oct 1.

Tea consumption and depressive symptoms in older people in rural China.

Author information

1
Department of Psychological Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore City, Singapore; Department of Psychological Medicine, National University Health System, Singapore.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the association between tea consumption and depressive symptoms in Chinese older people and to explore the mediating role of cerebrovascular disease in the association.

DESIGN:

Population-based cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

A rural community near Qufu in Shandong, China.

PARTICIPANTS:

Community-dwelling individuals aged 60 and older (mean 68.6; 59.3% female) from the Confucius Hometown Aging Project (N = 1,368).

MEASUREMENTS:

Data were collected through interviews, clinical examinations, and psychological testing, following a standard procedure. Presence of high depressive symptoms was defined as a score of 5 or greater on the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale.

RESULTS:

Of the 1,368 participants, 165 (12.1%) were weekly and 489 (35.7%) were daily tea consumers. Compared with no or irregular tea consumption, controlling for age, sex, education, leisure activities, number of comorbidities, and Mini-Mental State Examination score, the odds ratios of having high depressive symptoms were 0.86 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.56-1.32) for weekly and 0.59 (95% CI = 0.43-0.81) for daily tea consumption (P for linear trend = .001); the linear trend of the association remained statistically significant when further controlling for history of stroke, transient ischemic attacks, and presence of carotid plaques.

CONCLUSIONS:

Daily tea consumption is associated with a lower likelihood of depressive symptoms in Chinese older people living in a rural community. The association appears to be independent of cerebrovascular disease and atherosclerosis.

KEYWORDS:

China; aging; cerebrovascular disease; depressive symptoms; population-based study; tea consumption

PMID:
24117348
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.12496
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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