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PLoS One. 2013 Oct 7;8(10):e76902. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0076902. eCollection 2013.

Circulating adipocytokines and chronic kidney disease.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Adipokines have been associated with atherosclerotic heart disease, which shares many common risk factors with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but their relationship with CKD has not been well characterized.

METHODS:

We investigated the association of plasma leptin, resistin and adiponectin with CKD in 201 patients with CKD and 201 controls without. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or presence of albuminuria. Quantile regression and logistic regression models were used to examine the association between adipokines and CKD adjusting for multiple confounding factors.

RESULTS:

Compared to controls, adjusted median leptin (38.2 vs. 17.2 ng/mL, p<0.0001) and adjusted mean resistin (16.2 vs 9.0 ng/mL, p<0.0001) were significantly higher in CKD cases. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of CKD comparing the highest tertile to the lower two tertiles was 2.3 (1.1, 4.9) for leptin and 12.7 (6.5, 24.6) for resistin. Median adiponectin was not significantly different in cases and controls, but the odds ratio comparing the highest tertile to the lower two tertiles was significant (1.9; 95% CI, 1.1, 3.6). In addition, higher leptin, resistin, and adiponectin were independently associated with lower eGFR and higher urinary albumin levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that adipocytokines are independently and significantly associated with the risk and severity of CKD. Longitudinal studies are warranted to evaluate the prospective relationship of adipocytokines to the development and progression of CKD.

PMID:
24116180
PMCID:
PMC3792047
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0076902
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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