Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pharmacoeconomics. 2013 Nov;31(11):1051-61. doi: 10.1007/s40273-013-0093-y.

Eliciting preferences for prioritizing treatment of rare diseases: the role of opportunity costs and framing effects.

Author information

1
Department of Health Management and Health Economics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1089, Blindern, 0317, Oslo, Norway, arna.desser@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Understanding societal preferences regarding resource allocation in the health sector has gained importance as countries increasingly base reimbursement decisions on economic evaluations. Preference elicitation using surveys, a common practice in the health sector, is subject to a range of framing effects.

OBJECTIVE:

This research investigates the importance of (theoretically relevant) opportunity costs and (theoretically irrelevant) framing effects on stated preferences for prioritizing treatment of rare (orphan) diseases.

METHODS:

We elicited preferences from Norwegians, aged 40-67, using simple trade-off exercises. Respondents were randomised to different opportunity costs of the rare disease or to different framings of the trade-off exercises.

RESULTS:

Respondents were quite sensitive to the visual presentation of the choice problem, and, to a lesser extent, to focusing and labelling effects. Elicited preferences varied little in response to large changes in opportunity costs, suggesting scope-insensitivity among respondents.

CONCLUSIONS:

Preferences for prioritizing treatment of rare diseases elicited using trade-off exercises are insensitive to (theoretically relevant) opportunity costs, but sensitive to (theoretically irrelevant) framing effects.

PMID:
24114738
DOI:
10.1007/s40273-013-0093-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center