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Phys Sportsmed. 2013 Sep;41(3):29-35. doi: 10.3810/psm.2013.09.2021.

Cissus quadrangularis reduces joint pain in exercise-trained men: a pilot study.

Author information

1
Cardiorespiratory/Metabolic Laboratory, Department of Health and Sport Sciences, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. rbloomer@memphis.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Strenuous, high-volume exercise is often associated with inflammation and joint pain. Cissus quadrangularis (CQ) has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of our study was to determine the therapeutic effects of CQ supplementation in healthy, exercise-trained men with joint-specific pain.

METHODS:

Twenty-nine men between the ages of 20 and 46 years, who reportedly experienced chronic joint pain as a result of strenuous exercise, participated in our pilot study. All men received CQ 3200 mg daily for 8 weeks. Before and after the 8-week intervention period, subjects completed a questionnaire to determine their degree of joint pain (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index of Osteoarthritis [WOMAC]). Clinical measures (eg, heart rate, blood pressure, blood biomarkers) were also collected for each subject pre- (baseline) and post-intervention.

RESULTS:

Subject ratings for multiple variables within the WOMAC Index improved (decreased) significantly (P < 0.05), with the subject mean total WOMAC score decreasing from 25.4 ± 2.4 to 17.4 ± 2.1 (~31%), pre- to post-intervention. No clinical measure was significantly impacted by use of CQ supplementation.

CONCLUSION:

An 8-week course of supplementation with CQ reduced joint pain in a sample of 29 young, otherwise healthy, exercise-trained men. Additional study is needed to extend these findings, including comparison with a placebo-controlled cohort, and possibly, examining effects of CQ use in women and older adult subjects.

PMID:
24113700
DOI:
10.3810/psm.2013.09.2021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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