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World J Gastroenterol. 2013 Sep 28;19(36):6062-8. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v19.i36.6062.

Clinical outcomes of radiation therapy for early-stage gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma.

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1
Sang-Won Kim, Do Hoon Lim, Yong Chan Ahn, Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710, South Korea.

Abstract

AIM:

To evaluate the clinical outcomes of radiation therapy (RT) for early-stage gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALToma).

METHODS:

The records of 64 patients treated between 1998 and 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. For Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-positive patients (n = 31), chemotherapy or H. pylori eradication therapy was the initial treatment. In patients with failure after H. pylori eradication, RT was performed. For H. pylori-negative patients (n = 33), chemotherapy or RT was the first-line treatment. The median RT dose was 36 Gy. The target volume included the entire stomach and the perigastric lymph node area.

RESULTS:

All of the patients completed RT without interruption and showed complete remission on endoscopic biopsy after treatment. Over a median follow-up period of 39 mo, the 5-year local control rate was 89%. Salvage therapy was successful in all relapsed patients. Secondary malignancies developed in three patients. The 5-year overall survival rate was 94%. No patient presented symptoms of moderate-to-severe treatment-related toxicities during or after RT.

CONCLUSION:

Radiotherapy results in favorable clinical outcomes in patients with early-stage gastric MALToma who experience failure of H. pylori eradication therapy and those who are H. pylori negative.

KEYWORDS:

Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma; Radiation therapy; Treatment response

PMID:
24106407
PMCID:
PMC3785628
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v19.i36.6062
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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