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J Med Virol. 2014 May;86(5):865-71. doi: 10.1002/jmv.23747. Epub 2013 Sep 16.

Viral etiology of influenza-like illnesses during the influenza season between December 2011 and April 2012.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Infectious Disease Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of respiratory viruses responsible for respiratory tract infections in Turkish children during the 2011-2012 influenza season. Nasal swabs were obtained from patients with symptoms suggestive of an influenza-like illness between December 2011 and April 2012. Samples were analyzed with multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to help identify the causative viral pathogen. A total of 200 patients were enrolled in the study. A respiratory virus was detected successfully in 102 (51%) children; influenza A (H3N2) in 39.2%, influenza B in 23.5%, RSV in 15.6%, rhinovirus in 13.7%, bocavirus in 2.9%, coronavirus in 2.9%, and metapneumovirus in 0.9% of patients. Only one patient was co-infected with bocavirus and influenza A virus. A statistically significant difference in the mean age of presentation was observed between the various viral pathogens (P < 0.001). Patients with RSV were significantly younger whereas children infected with the influenza viruses were significantly older. Comparison of symptoms revealed that fever and headache occurred more frequently with the influenza viruses than the other viruses combined (P < 0.001, <0.05). Durations of symptoms such as fever, cough, nasal congestion, and rhinorrhea were also significantly longer in the influenza group (P < 0.001, <0.005, <0.001, <0.005, respectively). Demographic analyses revealed that the school/daycare attendance was the only parameter associated with a significantly increased risk for influenza infection. With an overall viral pathogen detection rate of 51%, findings of the present study suggest other respiratory pathogens, whether viral or bacterial, may also lead to hospital visits due to influenza-like illnesses in children.

KEYWORDS:

children; influenza; respiratory viruses

PMID:
24105787
DOI:
10.1002/jmv.23747
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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