Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Virulence. 2013 Nov 15;4(8):707-15. doi: 10.4161/viru.26572. Epub 2013 Oct 8.

Seasonal H3N2 influenza A virus fails to enhance Staphylococcus aureus co-infection in a non-human primate respiratory tract infection model.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis; Rocky Mountain Laboratories; National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Institutes of Health; Hamilton, MT USA.
2
Center for Molecular and Translational Human Infectious Disease Research; The Methodist Hospital Research Institute; Houston, TX USA; Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine; The Methodist Hospital; Houston, TX USA.
3
Veterinary Branch; Rocky Mountain Laboratories; National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Institutes of Health; Hamilton, MT USA.
4
Laboratory of Virology; Rocky Mountain Laboratories; National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Institutes of Health; Hamilton, MT USA.
5
Center for Molecular and Translational Human Infectious Disease Research; The Methodist Hospital Research Institute; Houston, TX USA; Department of Medicine; The Methodist Hospital; Houston, TX USA.
6
Office of Operations Management; Rocky Mountain Laboratories; National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Institutes of Health; Hamilton, MT USA.
7
Laboratory of Infectious Diseases; National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Institutes of Health; Bethesda, MD USA.
8
Public Health Research Institute; University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey; Newark, NJ USA.

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus community-acquired pneumonia is often associated with influenza or an influenza-like syndrome. Morbidity and mortality due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) or influenza and pneumonia, which includes bacterial co-infection, are among the top causes of death by infectious diseases in the United States. We developed a non-lethal influenza A virus (IAV) (H3N2)/S. aureus co-infection model in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) to test the hypothesis that seasonal IAV infection predisposes non-human primates to severe S. aureus pneumonia. Infection and disease progression were monitored by clinical assessment of animal health; analysis of blood chemistry, nasal swabs, and X-rays; and gross pathology and histopathology of lungs from infected animals. Seasonal IAV infection in healthy cynomolgus macaques caused mild pneumonia, but unexpectedly, did not predispose these animals to subsequent severe infection with the community-associated MRSA clone USA300. We conclude that in our co-infection model, seasonal IAV infection alone is not sufficient to promote severe S. aureus pneumonia in otherwise healthy non-human primates. The implication of these findings is that comorbidity factors in addition to IAV infection are required to predispose individuals to secondary S. aureus pneumonia.

KEYWORDS:

MRSA; Staphylococcus aureus; USA300; coinfection; influenza a virus; pneumonia

PMID:
24104465
PMCID:
PMC3925702
DOI:
10.4161/viru.26572
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Taylor & Francis Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center