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Contact Dermatitis. 2014 Jan;70(1):56-62. doi: 10.1111/cod.12134. Epub 2013 Sep 19.

A survey of exposures related to recognized occupational contact dermatitis in Denmark in 2010.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2400, Copenhagen NV, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Skin diseases are the most commonly recognized occupational diseases in Denmark, and occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) comprises ∼95% of all cases.

OBJECTIVES:

To prevent occupational contact dermatitis, it is important to specifically identify exposures and work routines related to outbreak of the disease. The aim of this study was to give an overview of exposures for patients with occupational contact dermatitis in Denmark in 2010, and relate this to line of work and disease severity.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The study was a descriptive, register-based study including patients with recognized occupational contact dermatitis in Denmark in 2010. Data were obtained from the National Board of Industrial Injuries in Denmark, and comprised information about the skin disease as well as the occupation/industry of employment and exposures.

RESULTS:

One thousand five hundred and four patients, 1020 women and 484 men, were included in the study. Irritant contact dermatitis accounted for 70% of all cases; 68% of these were caused by wet work. Forty-six per cent of all patients were employed either in the healthcare sector, in cleaning, or as kitchen workers. Among contact allergies, the most common were to rubber additives from gloves and epoxy in patients employed in the windmill industry.

CONCLUSION:

The data are important for planning preventive efforts in the future. The workers in the healthcare sector, kitchen workers and cleaners constitute almost half of all cases, and future preventive efforts should be directed at these occupations.

KEYWORDS:

contact allergies; occupational contact dermatitis; wet work

PMID:
24102286
DOI:
10.1111/cod.12134
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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