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Mult Scler. 2014 May;20(6):733-8. doi: 10.1177/1352458513507356. Epub 2013 Oct 7.

Dalfampridine improves walking speed, walking endurance, and community participation in veterans with multiple sclerosis: a longitudinal cohort study.

Author information

1
Oregon Health and Science University and Portland VA Medical Center, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In short-term trials, dalfampridine extended release (ER) improves walking in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The tolerability and effects of dalfampridine-ER in clinical practice have not been reported.

OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this paper is to determine the clinical tolerability and effects of dalfampridine on walking and community participation.

METHODS:

All patients at the Portland VA Medical Center prescribed dalfampridine-ER over one year completed the Timed 25-Foot Walk (T25FW), Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12), Two-Minute Timed Walk (2MTW), and Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ) at baseline and follow-up clinic visits. Ongoing use and measures over one year were analyzed.

RESULTS:

A total of 39 patients (mean age 56.5 years, mean disease duration 19.5 years, 82% male, 38% relapsing-remitting MS, 62% progressive MS) were prescribed dalfampridine-ER. Twenty-four (62%) continued to take dalfampridine-ER. At initial follow-up, all measures improved significantly from baseline (T25FW: -2.7 s, p = 0.004; 2MTW: 41 feet (ft), p = 0.002; MSWS12: -11, p < 0.001; CIQ: 1.2, p = 0.003). At one year, walking endurance and self-perceived walking were still significantly improved (2MTW: 33 ft, p = 0.03; MSWS-12: 5.9, p = 0.007).

CONCLUSIONS:

Dalfampridine-ER was associated with short-term improvements in walking speed and community participation, and sustained improvements in walking endurance and self-perceived impact of MS on walking for one year. Our study supports the utility of this medication in late MS.

KEYWORDS:

Multiple sclerosis; cohort studies; cost effectiveness/economic; dalfampridine; walking

PMID:
24099749
DOI:
10.1177/1352458513507356
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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