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Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Oct;23(10):929-36. doi: 10.1016/j.numecd.2013.04.014. Epub 2013 Oct 4.

The relationship between nut consumption and blood pressure in an Iranian adult population: Isfahan Healthy Heart Program.

Author information

1
Hypertension Research Center, Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Institute, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Few studies outside of Western countries have evaluated the relationship between consumption of nuts and blood pressure (BP). This study aimed to investigate the relationship between nut consumption and blood pressure in an Iranian adult population.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We performed a cross-sectional investigation among 9660 randomly selected Iranian adults, sampled to represent three large Iranian regions, using data collected in the Isfahan Healthy Heart Program in 2007. The frequency of nut consumption was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP) were measured in duplicate by trained personnel using a standard protocol. Multiple linear and logistic regressions were applied to assess the relationship between nut intake and BP levels and the presence of hypertension as SBP ≥ 140 mmHg, and/or a DBP ≥ 90 mmHg and/or current use of at least one type of anti-hypertensive medication. Those with nut consumption ≥4 times/week showed less mean of BPs and hypertension prevalence, compared to those who consumed nuts <1 times/week (p < 0.001). Compared to no consumption, consuming nuts ≥4 times/week was associated with a 34% lower prevalence of hypertension (multivariate odds ratio (OR) = 0.66; confidence interval (CI) = 0.51-0.87; p for trend = 0.009).

CONCLUSIONS:

More frequent nut consumption is associated with lower BP and lower risk of hypertension among Iranian adults.

KEYWORDS:

Adult; Blood pressure; Hypertension; Iran; Nut

PMID:
24099725
DOI:
10.1016/j.numecd.2013.04.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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