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Simul Healthc. 2013 Dec;8(6):376-81. doi: 10.1097/SIH.0b013e31829b3ff9.

Simulation in the early management of gastroschisis.

Author information

1
From the Imperial College London (J.B.H.); and Department of Paediatric Surgery (V.P., M.H., S.C.), Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London, UK.

Abstract

AIM:

Our aim was to design, create, and validate a simulator model and simulation scenario for the early management of gastroschisis.

METHODS:

Candidates of varying surgical experience had 1 attempt on an abdominal wall defect simulator and were scored for 4 different aspects: resuscitation of the neonate, application of a silo by both a global rating scale and a procedure-specific checklist, and nontechnical skills (scored by Non-Technical Skills scale). Surgical trainees subsequently received a focused teaching module on the resuscitative management and the surgical decision-making process, including bowel protection methods. Trainees then had a second attempt, which was objectively analyzed for improvement.

RESULTS:

Candidates attempted the simulation and were assessed, looking for construct validity. There was a statistically significant difference between candidate experience levels for all aspects of the simulation (resuscitation, global rating scale, procedure-specific checklist, and nontechnical skills) calculated using analysis of variance. Feedback forms gave us face validity, with a mean adjusted score of 8.3/10 for realism. After teaching the module, there was a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05) of 20% for technical skills and 10% for nontechnical skills, which is comparable with similar controlled studies.

CONCLUSIONS:

We showed that creating and running a simulation scenario for the early management of gastroschisis is a feasible and useful tool for training and assessment. The simulation may also be able to discriminate between experience levels and could be used as a teaching aid to improve a surgeon's technical and nontechnical skills.

PMID:
24096914
DOI:
10.1097/SIH.0b013e31829b3ff9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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