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Biol Trace Elem Res. 2013 Dec;156(1-3):210-20. doi: 10.1007/s12011-013-9820-7. Epub 2013 Oct 6.

Preservation of bone structure and function by Lithothamnion sp. derived minerals.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, The University of Michigan, 1301 Catherine Road, Box 5602, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA, mnaslam@umich.edu.

Abstract

Progressive bone mineral loss and increasing bone fragility are hallmarks of osteoporosis. A combination of minerals isolated from the red marine algae, Lithothamnion sp. was examined for ability to inhibit bone mineral loss in female mice maintained on either a standard rodent chow (control) diet or a high-fat western diet (HFWD) for 5, 12, and 18 months. At each time point, femora were subjected to μ-CT analysis and biomechanical testing. A subset of caudal vertebrae was also analyzed. Following this, individual elements were assessed in bones. Serum levels of the 5b isoform of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and procollagen type I propeptide (P1NP) were also measured. Trabecular bone loss occurred in both diets (evident as early as 5 months). Cortical bone increased through month 5 and then declined. Cortical bone loss was primarily in mice on the HFWD. Inclusion of the minerals in the diet reduced bone mineral loss in both diets and improved bone strength. Bone mineral density was also enhanced by these minerals. Of several cationic minerals known to be important to bone health, only strontium was significantly increased in bone tissue from animals fed the mineral diets, but the increase was large (5-10 fold). Serum levels of TRAP were consistently higher in mice receiving the minerals, but levels of P1NP were not. These data suggest that trace minerals derived from marine red algae may be used to prevent progressive bone mineral loss in conjunction with calcium. Mineral supplementation could find use as part of an osteoporosis-prevention strategy.

PMID:
24096551
PMCID:
PMC3905747
DOI:
10.1007/s12011-013-9820-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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