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Exp Hematol. 2014 Jan;42(1):39-45. doi: 10.1016/j.exphem.2013.09.012. Epub 2013 Oct 2.

Outcomes of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Author information

1
Hematology and Stem Cell Transplantation Section, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. Electronic address: Nishitha.Reddy@Vanderbilt.Edu.
2
Hematology and Stem Cell Transplantation Section, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.

Abstract

Transplant outcomes of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) have not been elucidated as a single cohort in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We analyzed the outcomes of 270 adult recipients receiving autologous (auto) SCT (n = 198) or allogeneic (allo) SCT (n = 72) for NHL between the years 2000 and 2010. Five-year overall survival rates for B and T cell NHL were 58% and 50%, respectively (allo-SCT 51% vs. 54% for B and T-cell NHL, and auto-SCT 60% vs. 47% for B and T cell lymphoma, respectively). In multivariate analysis, the number of chemotherapy regimens and disease status pre-SCT were independently associated with long-term outcome after SCT (for both auto- and allo-SCT). We conclude that the type of transplantation offered to patients, based on patient selection and disease-related factors, can achieve long-term survival, highlighting the importance of further improvement in disease control and reducing procedure-related mortality. The role of transplantation needs to be reevaluated in the era of targeted therapy.

PMID:
24096123
PMCID:
PMC5002948
DOI:
10.1016/j.exphem.2013.09.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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