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Pediatr Clin North Am. 2013 Oct;60(5):1019-34. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2013.06.005. Epub 2013 Jul 24.

Acute bronchiolitis.

Author information

1
Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 22 South Greene Street, WGL 266, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address: gteshome@peds.umaryland.edu.

Abstract

Bronchiolitis is the most common lower respiratory tract infection to affect infants and toddlers. High-risk patients include infants younger than 3 months, premature infants, children with immunodeficiency, children with underlying cardiopulmonary or neuromuscular disease, or infants prone to apnea, severe respiratory distress, and respiratory failure. Bronchiolitis is a self-limited disease in healthy infants and children. Treatment is usually symptomatic, and the goal of therapy is to maintain adequate oxygenation and hydration. Use of a high-flow nasal cannula is becoming common for children with severe bronchiolitis.

KEYWORDS:

Acute bronchiolitis; Respiratory syncytial virus; Wheezing

PMID:
24093893
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcl.2013.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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