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Int Rev Neurobiol. 2013;109:151-64. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-420045-6.00007-9.

The role of timing in nerve reconstruction.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö/Hand Surgery, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. Electronic address: lars.dahlin@med.lu.se.

Abstract

The surgeon, who treats nerve injuries, should have knowledge about how peripheral nerves react to trauma, particularly an understanding about the extensive pathophysiological alterations that occur both in the peripheral and in the central nervous system. A large number of factors influence the functional outcome, where the surgeon only can affect a few of them. In view of the new knowledge about the delicate intracellular signaling pathways that are rapidly initiated in neurons and in nonneuronal cells with the purpose to induce nerve regeneration, the timing of nerve repair and reconstruction after injury has gained more interest. It is crucial to understand and to utilize the inborn mechanisms for survival and regeneration of neurons and for activation, survival, and proliferation of the Schwann cells and other cells that are acting after a nerve injury. Thus, experimental and clinical data clearly point toward the advantage of early nerve repair and reconstruction of injuries. Following an appropriate diagnosis of a nerve injury, the nerve should be promptly repaired or reconstructed, and new rehabilitation strategies should early be initiated. Considering nerve transfers in the treatment arsenal can shorten the time of nerve reinnervation of muscle targets. Timing of nerve repair and reconstruction is crucial after nerve injury.

KEYWORDS:

Apoptosis; Brain plasticity; Nerve injury; Nerve reconstruction; Neuron; Plasticity; Rehabilitation; Schwann cell; Timing; Transcription factor

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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