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J Health Commun. 2014;19(1):100-14. doi: 10.1080/10810730.2013.811319. Epub 2013 Oct 4.

Parental cancer beliefs and trust in health information from medical authorities as predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability.

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1
a Department of Communication , University of Maryland , College Park , Maryland , USA.

Abstract

This research examines parental cancer beliefs and trust in health information from medical authorities as predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability. Specifically, the authors investigated how parents' perceived susceptibility to and severity of cancer, fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention, and trust in health information from doctors/health professionals and government health agencies are related to willingness to vaccinate their daughters ages 11-12 years against HPV. The authors analyzed data from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey. The authors found that parents were more likely to accept the vaccine if they perceived a higher risk of getting cancer themselves and if they had a higher level of trust in health information from medical authorities. Perceived severity of cancer and fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention did not predict vaccine acceptance.

PMID:
24093156
DOI:
10.1080/10810730.2013.811319
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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