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Aesthetic Plast Surg. 2013 Dec;37(6):1176-81. doi: 10.1007/s00266-013-0210-5. Epub 2013 Oct 3.

Improved scar appearance with combined use of silicone gel and vitamin C for Asian patients: a comparative case series.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Institute for Human Tissue Restoration, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 120-752, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In Asians, facial scars, even fine surgical scars, often can be conspicuous and uncomfortable. The authors used a topical silicone gel containing vitamin C on facial scars for the purpose of making the scar less distinct.

METHODS:

The study enrolled 80 patients. For the experimental group, the topical silicone gel mixture containing vitamin C was applied from the time of stitch removal to 6 months after the operation. The control group did not undergo any adjunctive treatment. Each participant was evaluated using the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) as well as erythema and melanin indices by spectrophotometer.

RESULTS:

With the modified VSS, the experimental group showed a significant decrease in scar elevation (p = 0.026) and erythema (p = 0.025). The hypo- or hyperpigmentation of the scars was more normalized in the experimental group. In the measured results via spectrophotometer, the experimental group showed a significant decrease in the melanin index (p = 0.045). The erythema index showed a statistically significant difference between the time of stitch removal and 6 months after the operation in the experiment group only.

CONCLUSIONS:

Topical use of silicone gel containing vitamin C has the effect of improving the appearance of fine surgical scars in Asian facial skin.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE IV:

This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

PMID:
24091488
DOI:
10.1007/s00266-013-0210-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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