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Ther Umsch. 2013 Oct;70(10):607-11. doi: 10.1024/0040-5930/a000454.

[From Gleason score to Ann Arbor staging- a selective choice of important scores and staging systems in oncology].

[Article in German; Abstract available in German from the publisher]

Author information

1
Onkologie, Departement Innere Medizin, Kantonsspital Graubünden, Chur und Onkologie, Klinik Innere Medizin, Spital Walenstadt.

Abstract

in English, German

Hundreds scores and dozens staging systems exist in Oncology. They provide for example information on the spread and prognosis of a disease or are included in treatment decisions. Because of the existing diversity a description of all oncological codes would exceed the scope of this paper, the following articles focuses in the first part on some exemplary and lesser-known scores and in the second part on main staging systems in Oncology. Internet sites such as Wikipedia or Onkopedia provide answers to many other questions regarding ongologic scores and stages. As an example of a tumor graduation the Gleason score in prostate cancer is described. It provides not only information about the prognosis of the disease, but influences the primary treatment. In metastasic disease, the general condition of the patient is decisive on the question of whether a (further) systemic therapy should be applied. The general condition is classified with the Karnofsky index and in Oncology more frequently with the ECOG- or WHO-performance status. In solid tumors the response to treatment is assessed with RECIST criteria. The spread of solid malignancies is documented according to the TNM classification. This classification is regularly updated according to latest prognostic and therapeutic results. In contrast the Ann Arbor criterias - the staging system of lymphomas - have little changed since their initial description.

PMID:
24091341
DOI:
10.1024/0040-5930/a000454
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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