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Clin Neurophysiol. 2014 Mar;125(3):449-56. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2013.07.026. Epub 2013 Sep 24.

Auditory event-related potentials at preschool age in children born very preterm.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Lund University and Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: holger.hovel@med.lu.se.
2
Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Cognitive Science, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Finnish Centre of Excellence in Interdisciplinary Music Research, University of Jyväskylä, Helsinki, Finland.
3
Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Cognitive Science, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Finnish Centre of Excellence in Interdisciplinary Music Research, University of Jyväskylä, Helsinki, Finland; Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
4
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
5
Department of Clinical Sciences, Neurophysiology, Lund University and Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
6
Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Lund University and Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess auditory event-related potentials at preschool age in children born very preterm (VP, 27.4 ± 1.9 gestational weeks, n=70) with a high risk of cognitive dysfunction.

METHODS:

We used an oddball paradigm consisting of a standard tone randomly replaced by one of three infrequent deviants (differing in frequency, sound direction or duration).

RESULTS:

The P1 and N2 latencies were inversely correlated to age (50-63 months) both in VP (r=-0.451, p<0.001, and r=-0.305, p=0.01, respectively) and term born controls (TC; n=15). VP children had smaller P1 than near-term (n=12) or TC (1.70 ± 0.17 μV vs 2.68 ± 0.41 and 2.92 ± 0.43, respectively; p<0.05). Mismatch negativity response did not differ between groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data suggest a fast maturation of P1 and N2 responses with fast decrease in P1 and N2 latencies around the age of 5 years. Mismatch negativity response does not seem to be a robust measure for defining abnormalities in VP children.

SIGNIFICANCE:

In ERP studies in preschool children, even small, non-significant group differences in age at recording should be corrected for. Very preterm born children at preschool age have aERP patterns as earlier described in full-term born children with cognitive deficits.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive disorders; Event-related potential (ERP); Maturation; Mismatch negativity (MMN); N1; P2; Very premature infant

PMID:
24075602
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2013.07.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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