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J Adolesc Health. 2014 Jan;54(1):54-60.e9. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.08.003. Epub 2013 Sep 26.

Patterns of current use of tobacco products among U.S. high school students for 2000-2012--findings from the National Youth Tobacco Survey.

Author information

1
Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: RArrazola@cdc.gov.
2
Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to assess patterns and trends of tobacco use among high school students to better understand which products are used individually or concurrently.

METHODS:

Data from the National Youth Tobacco Survey from 2000 through 2012 were used to assess patterns and trends of current tobacco use (cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, and other tobacco products) among U.S. high school students. We assessed use of products individually and concurrently.

RESULTS:

During 2000-2012, overall linear declines were observed in current use of any tobacco product from 33.6% to 20.4% (p < .05), current use of only 1 tobacco product, from 18.8% to 10.5% (p < .05), and current poly tobacco use, from 14.7% to 9.9% (p < .05), among high school students. Overall current use of only cigarettes had both a linear decline, from 14.0% to 4.7%, as well as a quadratic trend.

CONCLUSIONS:

During 2000-2012, the most significant overall decline observed was for students who reported smoking only cigarettes. The results suggest that more data on the use of multiple tobacco products, not just cigarettes, is needed to guide tobacco prevention and control policies and programs.

KEYWORDS:

Current tobacco use; High school students; United States

PMID:
24074604
PMCID:
PMC4534716
DOI:
10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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