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Surgery. 2013 Oct;154(4):927-31; discussion 931-3. doi: 10.1016/j.surg.2013.04.040.

Etiology and incidence of pediatric gallbladder disease.

Author information

1
From the Hiram C. Polk, Jr., M.D. Department of Surgery, Division of Pediatric Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The spectrum of pediatric biliary tract disease is changing. The goal of this study was to examine the causes and comorbidities of pediatric gallbladder disease at our institution.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective chart review on consecutive patient at Kosair Children's Hospital who underwent cholecystectomy over a 9-year time period ending in 2012.

RESULTS:

Among the 453 patients in the study group, the average age was 13.3 years and 67.2% were female. Indications for cholecystectomy were gallstones in 285 (63%) and biliary dyskinesia in 140 (33%). Of the patients with gallstones, 68 children (15%) had hemolytic disease. Although the number of cholecystectomies for hemolytic disease was relatively stable throughout our study, the number for biliary dyskinesia and non-hemolytic (cholesterol) cholelithiasis rose by 63% and 216%, respectively. Average body mass index (BMI) for patients with non-hemolytic (cholesterol) stones and biliary dyskinesia were significantly greater than the average BMI for patients with hemolytic stones (P < .0001). In addition, the average BMI for children with non-hemolytic (cholesterol) stones was greater than the average BMI with biliary dyskinesia (P < .0001).

CONCLUSION:

Symptomatic gallbladder disease increased over the study period. Biliary dyskinesia and children with non-hemolytic disease are responsible for this increase.

PMID:
24074432
DOI:
10.1016/j.surg.2013.04.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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