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Can J Diabetes. 2013 Aug;37(4):243-248. doi: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2013.05.005. Epub 2013 Aug 2.

Changes in depressive symptoms and changes in lifestyle-related indicators: a 1-year follow-up study among adults with type 2 diabetes in Quebec.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
2
Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
3
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Montreal Diabetes Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
4
Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Montreal Diabetes Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Epidemiology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
5
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Centre de Recherche Fernand-Seguin, Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
7
Centre de Recherche Fernand-Seguin, Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
8
Department of Psychiatry, Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
9
Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Montreal Diabetes Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montreal Diabetes Research Center and the Department of Nutrition, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: irene.strychar@umontreal.ca.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The study purpose was to examine the association between changes in depressive symptoms and changes in lifestyle-related indicators among adults with type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

A longitudinal survey was conducted among individuals with type 2 diabetes in Quebec. The sample consisted of 1183 subjects who responded to the baseline and 1-year follow-up telephone interviews, with complete data for depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire 9). Regression models were used to determine associations between changes in depressive symptoms and changes in lifestyle-related indicators (physical activity, body mass index (BMI)) and, perception-related indicators (control of body weight and of amount of food eaten).

RESULTS:

After 1 year, 136 subjects (11.5%) developed depression (major or minor), 118 (10%) remained depressed, 829 (70%) remained not depressed and 100 (8.5%) reverted to not depressed. Subjects who developed depression, compared with those who remained not depressed, were more likely to be inactive at baseline, remain inactive at 1 year, report a worsening of their perception of controlling body weight, report maintaining a poor perception of controlling amount of food eaten and report maintaining a poor perception of controlling body weight (p<0.05). The same factors were associated with maintenance of depression at 1 year (p<0.05). Changes in BMI were not associated with changes in depressive symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

Physical inactivity, perception of poor control of body weight and amount of food eaten have been found to be associated prospectively with the development and persistence of depression and, therefore, should be considered priority targets for diabetes treatment. Depression is related to the continuation of poor lifestyle and perception-related indicators.

KEYWORDS:

Perceptions du poids corporel; body weight perceptions; depressive symptoms; diabète de type 2; lifestyle; mode de vie; symptômes dépressifs; type 2 diabetes

PMID:
24070888
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcjd.2013.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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