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PLoS One. 2013 Sep 12;8(9):e75810. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0075810. eCollection 2013.

Structured pro-active care for chronic depression by practice nurses in primary care: a qualitative evaluation.

Author information

1
Research Department of Primary Care & Population Health, University College London, Royal Free Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This qualitative study explored the impact and appropriateness of structured pro-active care reviews by practice nurses for patients with chronic or recurrent depression and dysthymia within the ProCEED trial. ProCEED (Pro-active Care and its Evaluation for Enduring Depression) was a United Kingdom wide randomised controlled trial, comparing usual general practitioner care with structured 'pro-active care' which involved 3 monthly review appointments with practice nurses over 2 years for patients with chronic or recurrent depression.

METHOD:

In-depth interviews were completed with 41 participants: 26 patients receiving pro-active care and 15 practice nurses providing this care. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using a 'framework' approach.

RESULTS:

Patients perceived the practice nurses to be appropriate professionals to engage with regarding their depression and most nurses felt confident in a case management role. The development of a therapeutic alliance between the patient and nurse was central to this model and, where it appeared lacking, dissatisfaction was felt by both patients and nurses with a likely negative impact on outcomes. Patient and nurse factors impacting on the therapeutic alliance were identified and nurse typologies explored.

DISCUSSION:

Pro-active care reviews utilising practice nurses as case managers were found acceptable by the majority of patients and practice nurses and may be a suitable way to provide care for patients with long-term depression in primary care. Motivated and interested practice nurses could be an appropriate and valuable resource for this patient group. This has implications for resource decisions by clinicians and commissioners within primary care.

PMID:
24069451
PMCID:
PMC3772088
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0075810
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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