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Eur J Public Health. 2014 Aug;24(4):679-84. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckt139. Epub 2013 Sep 24.

Health-related quality of life and risk factor control: the importance of educational level in prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

Author information

1
1 Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany dominik.ose@med.uni-heidelberg.de.
2
2 Institute of Medical Biometry and Informatics, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
3
1 Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany3 Institute for Population Health-Centre for Primary Care, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
4
1 Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany4 Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Scientific Institute for Quality of Healthcare, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
5
1 Department of General Practice and Health Services Research, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
6
4 Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Scientific Institute for Quality of Healthcare, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study aimed to describe and to analyse the importance of educational level for controlled risk factors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

METHODS:

This observational study was conducted in nine European countries (5632 patients in 249 practices). We compared patients with a low level of education (up to 9 years) with patients with a high level of education (>9 years), with regard to controlled cardiovascular disease risk factors and HRQoL. A multilevel approach was used for statistical analysis.

RESULTS:

Patients with a low level of education were older (P < 0.001), more often female (P < 0.001), more often single (P < 0.001) and had a higher number of other conditions (e.g. heart failure) (P < 0.001). Significant differences in terms of controlled risk factors were revealed for blood pressure (RR) ≤ 140/90 mmHg (P = 0.039) and the sum of controlled risk factors (P = 0.027). Higher age, lower education, female gender, living as single, patient group (coronary heart disease patients) and the number of other conditions were negatively associated with HRQoL. A higher sum of controlled risk factors were positively associated with higher HRQoL in the whole sample (r = 0.0086, P < 0.001) as well as in both educational-level groups (r = 0.0075, P = 0.038 in the low-level group and r = 0.0082, P = 0.001 in the high-level group).

CONCLUSION:

Patients with a lower educational level were more often females, singles, had a higher number of other conditions, a higher number of uncontrolled risk factors and a lower HRQoL. However, the higher the control of risk factors was, the higher the HRQoL was overall as well as in both educational-level groups.

PMID:
24068548
DOI:
10.1093/eurpub/ckt139
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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