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Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013;2013:382643. doi: 10.1155/2013/382643. Epub 2013 Aug 27.

Differences in Blood Urea and Creatinine Concentrations in Earthed and Unearthed Subjects during Cycling Exercise and Recovery.

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1
Department of Neurosurgery, Military Clinical Hospital, Powstancow Warszawy 5, 85-681 Bydgoszcz, Poland.

Abstract

Contact of humans with the earth, either directly (e.g., with bare feet) or using a metal conductor, changes their biochemical parameters. The effects of earthing during physical exercise are unknown. This study was carried out to evaluate selected biochemical parameters in subjects who were earthed during cycling. In a double-blind, crossover study, 42 participants were divided into two groups and earthed during exercise and recovery. One group was earthed in the first week during 30 minutes of cycling exercise and during recovery, and a second group was earthed in the second week. A double-blind technique was applied. Blood samples were obtained before each training session, after 15 and 30 minutes of exercise, and after 40 minutes of recovery. Significantly lower blood urea levels were observed in subjects earthed during exercise and relaxation. These significant differences were noted in both groups earthed at the beginning of exercise (P < 0.0001), after 15 (P < 0.0001) and 30 minutes (P < 0.0001) of exercise, and after 40 minutes of relaxation (P < 0.0001). Creatinine concentrations in earthed subjects during exercise were unchanged. Conclusions. Earthing during exercise lowers blood urea concentrations and may inhibit hepatic protein catabolism or increase renal urea excretion. Exertion under earthing may result in a positive protein balance.

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