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Exp Eye Res. 2014 Jan;118:1-12. doi: 10.1016/j.exer.2013.09.005. Epub 2013 Sep 19.

Proteomics in uveal melanoma.

Author information

1
Royal College of Surgeons Ireland, Stephen's Green, Dublin 2, Ireland; National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Collins Avenue, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland. Electronic address: Pathma.Ramasamy@dcu.ie.
2
Royal College of Surgeons Ireland, Stephen's Green, Dublin 2, Ireland; Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital, Adelaide Road, Dublin 2, Ireland. Electronic address: Conorcmurphy@rcsi.ie.
3
National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Collins Avenue, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland. Electronic address: Martin.Clynes@dcu.ie.
4
Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital, Adelaide Road, Dublin 2, Ireland. Electronic address: Noel.Horgan@rveeh.ie.
5
Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital, Adelaide Road, Dublin 2, Ireland. Electronic address: paul.moriarty@rveeh.ie.
6
Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital, Adelaide Road, Dublin 2, Ireland. Electronic address: Damien.Tiernan@rveeh.ie.
7
Macular Pigment Research Group, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford, Ireland. Electronic address: sbeatty@wit.ie.
8
Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital, Adelaide Road, Dublin 2, Ireland. Electronic address: Susan.Kennedy@rveeh.ie.
9
National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Collins Avenue, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland. Electronic address: Paula.Meleady@dcu.ie.

Abstract

Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with an incidence of 5-7 per million per year. It is associated with the development of metastasis in about 50% of cases, and 40% of patients with uveal melanoma die of metastatic disease despite successful treatment of the primary tumour. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years are 65%, 50% and 45% respectively. Unlike progress made in many other areas of cancer, uveal melanoma is still poorly understood and survival rates have remained similar over the past 25 years. Recently, advances made in molecular genetics have improved our understanding of this disease and stratification of patients into low risk and high risk for developing metastasis. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed using proteomic methods. This review will give an overview of various proteomic technologies currently employed in life sciences research, and discuss proteomic studies of uveal melanoma.

KEYWORDS:

DJ-1; FABP3; HSP27; PFKM; TPI1; proteomic technologies; proteomics; syntenin; uveal melanoma

PMID:
24056206
DOI:
10.1016/j.exer.2013.09.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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