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AIDS. 2014 Feb 20;28(4):543-7. doi: 10.1097/QAD.0000000000000065.

HIV-1 seroreversion in HIV-1-infected children: do genetic determinants play a role?

Author information

1
aDepartment of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Clinical Immunology, Center for Child and Adolescent Health bInstitute for Virology, Medical Faculty cBone Marrow Donor Center with Eurocord Bank and Transplantation Immunology, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf dDepartment of Pediatric Pneumology and Immunology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin eChildren Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich fUniversity Medical Center Mannheim, Pediatric Clinic, Mannheim, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

HIV-1 seroreversion in infants with vertically transmitted HIV-1 infection who started ART in the first months of life has been reported in only a subset of patients. However, the reason why most infants remain seropositive despite similar treatment response is not understood. Here, we assessed whether HIV-1 seroreversion in maternally infected infants is associated with genetic determinants.

METHODS:

HIV-1-infected infants with a history of documented HIV-1 seroreversion were identified throughout Germany using a standardized questionnaire. At study entry immune reconstitution and anti-HIV-1 antibody expression were monitored as clinical parameters. To search for genetic determinants high-resolution HLA genotyping was performed. In addition, the coding sequence of the chemokine receptor CCR5 was analyzed by Sanger sequencing regarding potential mutations.

RESULTS:

Patients showed normal numbers and frequencies of lymphocyte subpopulations. Five out of eight patients still had seronegative HIV-1 antibody status at study entry. HLA genotyping revealed the enrichment of HLA-DQB1*03 and DQB1*06 alleles within the patient cohort. Only one patient was found to carry a 32 bp-deletion within the CCR5 gene.

CONCLUSION:

Our results indicate that the phenotype of HIV-1 seroreversion in infants might correlate with the presence of HLA class II alleles DQB1*03 and DQB1*06. This finding supports the idea of genetic predisposition determining HIV-1 seroreversion in vertically infected infants effectively treated with ART.

PMID:
24056069
DOI:
10.1097/QAD.0000000000000065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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