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Arch Med Res. 2013 Aug;44(6):454-8. doi: 10.1016/j.arcmed.2013.08.007. Epub 2013 Sep 17.

Epidemiological association between body fat percentage and cervical cancer: a cross-sectional population-based survey from Mexico.

Author information

1
Centro de Investigación y de Educación Continua (CENINVEC), State of Mexico, Mexico. Electronic address: 2003dlopez@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Various studies have reported a direct association of cervical cancer risk with obesity and weight but not with the body fat percentage (BFP). The aim of this study was to analyze various anthropometric measures as potential risk factors for cervical cancer.

METHODS:

A total of 20,236 women were included in a cross-sectional population-based survey. Obesity was defined according to the World Health Organization criteria, and central obesity was ≥80 cm; the BFP was defined using the Deurenberg equation (BFP = 1.2 [BMI] + 0.23 [age] - 10.8 [sex] - 5.4). The odds ratio (OR) was estimated from the chi square test and logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of cervical cancer increased from 514 (95% confidence interval [CI] 321, 707) and 680 (95% CI 494, 866) to 732 (95% CI 535, 928) per 100,000 inhabitants in subjects with a normal weight, subjects who were overweight and subjects who were obese, respectively. Moreover, an association between cervical cancer and BFP (OR 1.027; CI 95% 1.006, 1.048; p = 0.012) was observed, and the risk increased with a BFP ≥45% (OR 2.369; CI 95% 1.284, 4.369; p = 0.006).

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest a trend between the body mass index and the increasing prevalence of cervical cancer. In addition, the data showed a significant association between the BFP and cervical cancer, and this epidemiological association was higher as the BFP increased.

KEYWORDS:

Body fat percentage; Body mass index; Cervical cancer; Cross-sectional population-based study

PMID:
24051040
DOI:
10.1016/j.arcmed.2013.08.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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