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Age Ageing. 2014 Jan;43(1):64-9. doi: 10.1093/ageing/aft135. Epub 2013 Sep 15.

Sensorimotor and psychosocial determinants of 3-year incident mobility disability in middle-aged and older adults.

Author information

1
School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

to identify sensorimotor and psychosocial determinants of 3-year incident mobility disability.

DESIGN:

prospective.

SETTING:

population-based sample of community-dwelling older persons.

PARTICIPANTS:

community-living middle-aged and older persons (age: 50-85 years) without baseline mobility disability (n = 622).

MEASUREMENTS:

mobility disability, defined as self-reported inability to walk a quarter mile without resting or inability to walk up a flight of stairs unsupported, was ascertained at baseline and 3-year follow-up. Potential baseline determinant characteristics included demographics, education, social support, financial condition, knee extensor strength, visual contrast sensitivity, cognition, depression, presence of chronic conditions and history of falls.

RESULTS:

a total of 13.5% participant reported 3-year incident mobility disability. Age ≥75 years, female sex, knee extensor strength in the lowest quartile, visual contrast sensitivity <1.7 on the Pelli-Robson chart or significant depressive symptoms (CESD score >16) were independent determinants of 3-year incident mobility disability (ORs 1.84-16.51).

CONCLUSIONS:

low visual contrast sensitivity, poor knee extensor strength and significant depressive symptoms are independent determinants of future onset of mobility disability.

KEYWORDS:

depression; disability; mobility; muscle strength; older people; vision

PMID:
24042004
PMCID:
PMC3861339
DOI:
10.1093/ageing/aft135
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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