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PLoS One. 2013 Sep 10;8(9):e74858. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0074858. eCollection 2013.

Comparative efficiency of HIV-1-infected T cell killing by NK cells, monocytes and neutrophils.

Author information

1
Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom ; HIV-Specific Immunity Section, Laboratory of Immunoregulation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America.

Abstract

HIV-1 infected cells are eliminated in infected individuals by a variety of cellular mechanisms, the best characterized of which are cytotoxic T cell and NK cell-mediated killing. An additional antiviral mechanism is antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Here we use primary CD4(+) T cells infected with the BaL clone of HIV-1 as target cells and autologous NK cells, monocytes, and neutrophils as effector cells, to quantify the cytotoxicity mediated by the different effectors. This was carried out in the presence or absence of HIV-1-specific antiserum to assess antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We show that at the same effector to target ratio, NK cells and monocytes mediate similar levels of both antibody-dependent and antibody-independent killing of HIV-1-infected T cells. Neutrophils mediated significant antibody-dependent killing of targets, but were less effective than monocytes or NK cells. These data have implications for acquisition and control of HIV-1 in natural infection and in the context of vaccination.

PMID:
24040353
PMCID:
PMC3769266
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0074858
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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