Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2013 Oct;97(20):8849-57. doi: 10.1007/s00253-013-5227-9. Epub 2013 Sep 15.

TRAIL and microRNAs in the treatment of prostate cancer: therapeutic potential and role of nanotechnology.

Author information

1
Laboratory for Translational Oncology and Personalized Medicine, Rashid Latif Medical College, 35 Km Ferozepur Road, Lahore, Pakistan, ammadahmad638@yahoo.com.

Abstract

Disruption of spatiotemporal behavior of intracellular signaling cascades including tumor necrosis factor alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated signaling in prostate cancer has gained tremendous attention in the past few years. There is an increasing effort in translating the emerging information about TRAIL-mediated signaling obtained through experimental and preclinical data to clinic. Fascinatingly, novel targeting approaches are being developed to enhance the tissue- or subcellular-specific delivery of drugs with considerable focus on prostate cancer. These applications have the potential to revolutionize prostate cancer therapeutic strategies and include the accumulation of drugs in target tissue as well as the selection of internalizing ligands for enhanced receptor-mediated uptake of drugs. In this mini-review, we outline outstanding developments in therapeutic strategies based on the regulation and/or targeting of TRAIL pathway for the treatment of prostate cancer. Moreover, microRNAs (miRNAs), with potential transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, will be presented for their potential in prostate cancer treatment. Emphasis has been given to the use of delivery approaches, especially based on nanotechnology. Considerably, enhanced information regarding miRNA regulation of TRAIL-mediated signaling in prostate cancer cells may provide potential biomarkers for the characterization of patients as responders and nonresponders of TRAIL-based therapy and could provide rationalized basis for combination therapies with TRAIL death receptor-targeting drugs.

PMID:
24037407
DOI:
10.1007/s00253-013-5227-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center