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Resuscitation. 2014 Jan;85(1):99-103. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2013.08.275. Epub 2013 Sep 12.

A history of smoking is associated with improved survival in patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest.

Author information

  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, United States. Electronic address: Jeremy.s.pollock@vanderbilt.edu.
  • 2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, United States.
  • 3Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, United States.
  • 4Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the association between smoking and survival with a good neurologic outcome in patients following cardiac arrest treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH).

METHODS:

We conducted a retrospective observational study of a prospectively collected cohort of 188 consecutive patients following cardiac arrest treated with TH between May 2007 and January 2012. Smoking status was retrospectively collected via chart review and was classified as "ever" or "never". Primary endpoint was survival to hospital discharge with a good neurologic outcome and was compared between smokers and nonsmokers. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between smoking status and neurologic outcome at hospital discharge; adjusting for age, initial rhythm, time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), bystander CPR, and time to initiation of TH.

RESULTS:

Smokers were significantly more likely to survive to hospital discharge with good neurologic outcome compared to nonsmokers (50% vs. 28%, p=0.003). After adjusting for age, initial rhythm, time to ROSC, bystander CPR, and time to initiation of TH, a history of smoking was associated with increased odds of survival to hospital discharge with good neurologic outcome (OR 3.54, 95% CI 1.41-8.84, p=0.007).

CONCLUSIONS:

Smoking is associated with improved survival with good neurologic outcome in patients following cardiac arrest. We hypothesize that our findings reflect global ischemic conditioning caused by smoking.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiac arrest; Post-resuscitation care; Smoking; Therapeutic hypothermia

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