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J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2014 Jun;28(6):689-99. doi: 10.1111/jdv.12253. Epub 2013 Aug 27.

Laser and light-based treatment of Keloids--a review.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Keloids are an overgrowth of fibrotic tissue outside the original boundaries of an injury and occur secondary to defective wound healing. Keloids often have a functional, aesthetic, or psychosocial impact on patients as highlighted by quality-of-life studies.

OBJECTIVES:

Our goal is to provide clinicians and scientists an overview of the data available on laser and light-based therapies for treatment of keloids, and highlight emerging light-based therapeutic technologies and the evidence available to support their use.

METHODS:

We employed the following search strategy to identify the clinical evidence reported in the biomedical literature: in November 2012, we searched PubMed.gov, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane Reviews (1980-present) for published randomized clinical trials, clinical studies, case series and case reports related to the treatment of keloids. The search terms we utilized were 'keloid(s)' AND 'laser' OR 'light-emitting diode' (LED) OR 'photodynamic therapy' (PDT) OR 'intense pulsed light' OR 'low level light' OR 'phototherapy.'

RESULTS:

Our search yielded 347 unique articles. Of these, 33 articles met our inclusion and exclusion criteria.

CONCLUSION:

We qualitatively conclude that laser and light-based treatment modalities may achieve favourable patient outcomes. Clinical studies using CO2 laser are more prevalent in current literature and a combination regimen may be an adequate ablative approach. Adding light-based treatments, such as LED phototherapy or PDT, to laser treatment regimens may enhance patient outcomes. Lasers and other light-based technology have introduced new ways to manage keloids that may result in improved aesthetic and symptomatic outcomes and decreased keloid recurrence.

PMID:
24033440
PMCID:
PMC4378824
DOI:
10.1111/jdv.12253
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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