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ISME J. 2014 Feb;8(2):295-308. doi: 10.1038/ismej.2013.155. Epub 2013 Sep 12.

High-fat diet alters gut microbiota physiology in mice.

Author information

1
Molecular Nutrition Unit, ZIEL-Research Center for Nutrition and Food Sciences, Technische Universität München, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany.
2
Proteomics and Bioanalytics, Technische Universität München, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany.
3
Division of Microbial Ecology, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
4
Department of Gastrointestinal Microbiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany.
5
1] INRA/AgroParisTech, Micalis UMR1319, Jouy-en-Josas, France [2] CSIRO Livestock Industries, Queensland Bioscience Precinct, St Lucia, Australia.
6
INRA/AgroParisTech, Micalis UMR1319, Jouy-en-Josas, France.
7
Research Unit Plant-Microbe Interactions, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Germany.
8
Analytical BioGeoChemistry, Helmoltz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Germany; Chair of Analytical Food Chemistry, Technische Universität München, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany.
9
Microbiology, ZIEL-Research Center for Nutrition and Food Sciences, Technische Universität München, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany.
10
1] Proteomics and Bioanalytics, Technische Universität München, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany [2] Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich, Germany.
11
Chair of Nutrition and Immunology, Technische Universität München, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany.
12
1] Chair of Nutrition and Immunology, Technische Universität München, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany [2] Junior Research Group Intestinal Microbiome, ZIEL-Research Center for Nutrition and Food Sciences, Technische Universität München, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany.

Abstract

The intestinal microbiota is known to regulate host energy homeostasis and can be influenced by high-calorie diets. However, changes affecting the ecosystem at the functional level are still not well characterized. We measured shifts in cecal bacterial communities in mice fed a carbohydrate or high-fat (HF) diet for 12 weeks at the level of the following: (i) diversity and taxa distribution by high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing; (ii) bulk and single-cell chemical composition by Fourier-transform infrared- (FT-IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy and (iii) metaproteome and metabolome via high-resolution mass spectrometry. High-fat diet caused shifts in the diversity of dominant gut bacteria and altered the proportion of Ruminococcaceae (decrease) and Rikenellaceae (increase). FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that the impact of the diet on cecal chemical fingerprints is greater than the impact of microbiota composition. Diet-driven changes in biochemical fingerprints of members of the Bacteroidales and Lachnospiraceae were also observed at the level of single cells, indicating that there were distinct differences in cellular composition of dominant phylotypes under different diets. Metaproteome and metabolome analyses based on the occurrence of 1760 bacterial proteins and 86 annotated metabolites revealed distinct HF diet-specific profiles. Alteration of hormonal and anti-microbial networks, bile acid and bilirubin metabolism and shifts towards amino acid and simple sugars metabolism were observed. We conclude that a HF diet markedly affects the gut bacterial ecosystem at the functional level.

PMID:
24030595
PMCID:
PMC3906816
DOI:
10.1038/ismej.2013.155
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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