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Nat Protoc. 2013 Oct;8(10):1907-15. doi: 10.1038/nprot.2013.117. Epub 2013 Sep 12.

Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from peripheral blood B cells.

Author information

1
HIV-Specific Immunity Section, Laboratory of Immunoregulation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), US National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

Isolation of monoclonal antibodies is an important technique for understanding the specificities and characteristics of antibodies that underlie the humoral immune response to a given antigen. Here we describe a technique for isolating monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The protocol includes strategies for the isolation of switch-memory B cells from peripheral blood, the culture of B cells, the removal of the supernatant for screening and the lysis of B cells in preparation for immunoglobulin heavy-chain and light-chain amplification and cloning. We have observed that the addition of cytokines IL-2, IL-21 and irradiated 3T3-msCD40L feeder cells can successfully stimulate switch-memory B cells to produce high concentrations of IgG in the supernatant. The supernatant may then be screened by appropriate assays for binding or for other functions. This protocol can be completed in 2 weeks. It is adaptable to use in other species and enables the efficient isolation of antibodies with a desired functional characteristic without prior knowledge of specificity.

PMID:
24030440
PMCID:
PMC4844175
DOI:
10.1038/nprot.2013.117
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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