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Prev Med. 2013 Dec;57(6):792-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.08.029. Epub 2013 Sep 9.

Muscle strength and physical activity are associated with self-rated health in an adult Danish population.

Author information

1
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. Electronic address: andreaswhansen@hotmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe associations of muscle strength, physical activity and self-rated health.

METHOD:

Isometric muscle strength by maximal handgrip strength (HGS) or muscle strength by 30s repeated chair stand test (30s-CS) was combined with leisure time physical activity. Using logistic regression odds ratio was calculated for good self-rated health according to the combined associations among 16,539 participants (59.7% women), mean age 51.9 (SD: 13.8) years, from a cross-sectional study in Denmark 2007-2008.

RESULTS:

Good self-rated health was positively associated with higher levels of physical activity and greater muscle strength. Regarding HGS the highest OR for good self-rated health was in the moderate/vigorous physically active participants with high HGS (OR=6.84, 95% CI: 4.85-9.65 and OR=7.34, 95% CI: 5.42-9.96 for men and women, respectively). Similarly the highest OR for good self-rated health was in the moderate/vigorous physically active participants with high scores in the 30s-CS test (6.06, 95% CI: 4.32-8.50 and 13.38, 95% CI: 9.59-18.67 for men and women, respectively). The reference groups were sedentary participants with low strength (HGS or 30s-CS).

CONCLUSION:

The combined score for physical activity level with either HGS or 30s-CS was strongly positively associated with self-related health.

KEYWORDS:

(30s-CS); (BMI); (HGS); (OR); (PA); 30seconds repeated chair stands; Muscle strength; Physical activity; Physical performance; Primary prevention; body mass index; handgrip strength; odds ratio; physical activity

PMID:
24029557
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.08.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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