Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Appetite. 2013 Dec;71:301-6. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2013.09.001. Epub 2013 Sep 8.

Age at dieting onset, body mass index, and dieting practices. A twin study.

Author information

1
Program in Nutritional Sciences, University of Washington, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Using a twin study design, we sought to determine whether an early age at dieting onset is a risk factor for higher adult body mass index (BMI) or use of risky dieting practices, independent of genetic and familial factors.

METHOD:

Female twins ages 18-60 years (N=950) from the University of Washington Twin Registry completed 2 surveys an average of 3 years apart. Analyses of individual twins and within-twin pairs tested associations of self-reported age at dieting onset with (1) adult BMI at baseline, (2) change in BMI between the two surveys and (3) risky dieting behaviors at baseline.

RESULTS:

In analyses mimicking studies of unrelated individuals, an earlier age at dieting onset was associated with greater adult BMI (p=0.003), higher Restraint Scale scores (p<0.001), greater use of risky dieting behaviors (p=0.04) and more weight cycling episodes (p<0.001). In within-pair models that control for genetic and familial factors, the only significant association was between an earlier age at dieting onset and more weight cycling episodes (p=0.006).

DISCUSSION:

Underlying genetic and familial factors may influence associations of early dieting with higher adult BMIs and risky dieting practices in women.

KEYWORDS:

Age of dieting onset; Body mass index; Dieting; Twin studies

PMID:
24025547
PMCID:
PMC3913472
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2013.09.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center