Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2014 Jul;22(7):642-52. doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2012.10.029. Epub 2013 Sep 8.

Depressive symptoms in Chinese-American subjects with cognitive impairment.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA; Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA.
2
Department of Neurology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center, Indianapolis, IN.
3
Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA.
4
Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, and Memory Disorders Clinic, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, CA.
6
Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA. Electronic address: hrosen@memory.ucsf.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To compare the prevalence of depressive symptoms and frequency of antidepressant use between a group of elderly Chinese-American subjects with and without cognitive impairment and a group of matched white subjects. A secondary aim was to examine the clinical and demographic predictors of depressive symptoms across these groups.

METHODS:

The study was conducted at an academic neurology subspecialty clinic. This was a case-control study with 140 Chinese-American subjects and 140 demographically and cognitively matched white subjects. In each group, there were 48 cognitively normal and 92 cognitively impaired participants (49 with mild cognitive impairment, 43 with Alzheimer disease). The proportion of individuals with significant depressive symptoms, as indicated by a Geriatric Depression Scale score ≥6 of 15, and frequency of antidepressant use were compared across groups by using χ(2) analysis. Factors predicting depressive symptoms, including racial and diagnostic group, age, gender, Mini-Mental State Examination score, level of functional impairment, education level, and medical comorbidities, were assessed by using linear regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Significant depressive symptoms were more common in cognitively impaired Chinese-American (35%) than cognitively impaired white (15%; χ(2)[1] = 9.4; p = 0.004) subjects. Chinese-American subjects with cognitive impairment were less likely to be receiving treatment for depression (12%) than white subjects with cognitive impairment (37%; χ(2)[1] = 15.6; p = 0.002). Racial and diagnostic group, age, level of functional impairment, Mini-Mental State Examination score, and education level were all statistically significant independent predictors of Geriatric Depression Scale score.

CONCLUSIONS:

Elderly Chinese-American subjects with cognitive impairment are at increased risk for unrecognized and untreated depressive symptoms compared with elderly white subjects with cognitive impairment. Education level may contribute to this risk or it may be a surrogate marker for other factors contributing to depressive symptoms in this group.

KEYWORDS:

Chinese American; dementia; geriatric depression

PMID:
24021225
PMCID:
PMC4309267
DOI:
10.1016/j.jagp.2012.10.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center