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Pediatr Pulmonol. 2014 Aug;49(8):790-9. doi: 10.1002/ppul.22877. Epub 2013 Sep 9.

Vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms and severe RSV bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada; Research Institute, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A number of small studies have suggested a relationship between vitamin D status and severe acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI), including RSV-bronchiolitis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphism and severe RSV-bronchiolitis through a systemic literature review and meta-analysis.

METHODS:

A comprehensive electronic literature search was conducted to identify all studies published before January 2013. Two reviewers independently screened all abstracts, followed by the full text of potential articles to evaluate eligibility. Study methodological quality was evaluated using the Newcastle Ottawa scale and individual component analysis. Meta-analysis evaluated associations at the allele and genotype levels.

RESULTS:

Of 803 studies identified from our literature search, three met eligibility criteria. Two VDR polymorphisms were included in more than one study: TaqI (rs731236) and FokI (rs2228570). All three reported a positive relationship between the FokI minor allele and disease with random effects meta-analyses demonstrating a statistically significant relationship (OR 1.52, CI: 1.12, 2.05). Genotype analysis was highly suggestive of a dominant or incomplete dominance model with combined odds ratios for fF (OR 1.73, CI: 0.92-3.36) and ff (OR 2.24, CI: 0.98-5.14) compared to the FF genotype. No association between TaqI and severe RSV-bronchiolitis was evident at the allele or genotype level.

CONCLUSIONS:

Available literature supports an association between the FokI polymorphism and severe RSV disease. Determination of VDR receptor polymorphism status could help predict high-risk infants who might benefit from preventive measures.

KEYWORDS:

pediatrics; risk factors; vitamin D

PMID:
24019226
DOI:
10.1002/ppul.22877
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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