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Am Heart J. 2013 Sep;166(3):597-603. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2013.06.004. Epub 2013 Aug 5.

Treatment strategies in patients with statin intolerance: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

Author information

1
Service de cardiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke 3001, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Statin therapy is a proven effective treatment of hyperlipidemia. However, a significant number of patients cannot tolerate statins. This study was conducted to review treatment strategies for patients intolerant to statin therapy with a focus on intermittent statin dosing.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We performed a retrospective analysis of medical records of 1,605 patients referred to the Cleveland Clinic Preventive Cardiology Section for statin intolerance between January 1995 and March 2010 with at least a 6-month follow-up. The changes in lipid profile, achievement of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals, and statin tolerance rate were analyzed. Most (72.5%) of patients with prior statin intolerance were able to tolerate a statin for the median follow-up time of 31 months. Patients on intermittent statin dosing (n = 149) had significantly lower LDL-C reduction compared with daily dosing group (n = 1,014; 21.3% ± 4.0% vs 27.7% ± 1.4%, P < .04). However, compared with the statin discontinued group (n = 442), they had a significantly higher LDL-C reduction (21.3% ± 4.0% vs 8.3 ± 2.2%, P < .001), and a significantly higher portion achieved their Adult Treatment Panel III goal of LDL-C (61% vs 44%, P < .05). There was a trend toward a decrease in all-cause mortality at 8 years for patients on daily and intermittent statin dosing compared with those who discontinued statin (P = .08).

CONCLUSIONS:

Most patients with previous statin intolerance can tolerate subsequent trial of statin. A strategy of intermittent statin dosing can be an effective therapeutic option in some patients and may result in reduction in LDL-C and achievement of LDL-C goals.

PMID:
24016512
PMCID:
PMC4038261
DOI:
10.1016/j.ahj.2013.06.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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