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J Korean Med Sci. 2013 Sep;28(9):1340-4. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2013.28.9.1340. Epub 2013 Aug 28.

The clinical measures associated with C-peptide decline in patients with type 1 diabetes over 15 years.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

This study was done to characterize the natural course of C-peptide levels in patients with type 1 diabetes and identify distinguishing characters among patients with lower rates of C-peptide decline. A sample of 95 children with type 1 diabetes was analyzed to retrospectively track serum levels of C-peptide, HbA1c, weight, BMI, and diabetic complications for the 15 yr after diagnosis. The clinical characteristics were compared between the patients with low and high C-peptide levels, respectively. The average C-peptide level among all patients was significantly reduced five years after diagnosis (P < 0.001). The incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis was significantly lower among the patients with high levels of C-peptide (P = 0.038). The body weight and BMI standard deviation scores (SDS) 15 yr after diagnosis were significantly higher among the patients with low C-peptide levels (weight SDS, P = 0.012; BMI SDS, P = 0.044). In conclusion, C-peptide level was significantly decreased after 5 yr from diagnosis. Type 1 diabetes patients whose beta-cell functions were preserved might have low incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis. The declines of C-peptide level after diagnosis in type 1 diabetes may be associated with changes of body weight and BMI.

KEYWORDS:

Body Mass Index; Body Weight; C-Peptide; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1; Diabetic Ketoacidosis

PMID:
24015040
PMCID:
PMC3763109
DOI:
10.3346/jkms.2013.28.9.1340
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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