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Circ Res. 2013 Oct 12;113(9):1087-1096. doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.113.301811. Epub 2013 Sep 6.

Brain angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2 shedding contributes to the development of neurogenic hypertension.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and Cardiovascular Center of Excellence, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Overactivity of the brain renin-angiotensin system is a major contributor to neurogenic hypertension. Although overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2 (ACE2) has been shown to be beneficial in reducing hypertension by transforming angiotensin II into angiotensin-(1-7), several groups have reported decreased brain ACE2 expression and activity during the development of hypertension.

OBJECTIVE:

We hypothesized that ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding results in decreased membrane-bound ACE2 in the brain, thus promoting the development of neurogenic hypertension.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

To test this hypothesis, we used the deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt model of neurogenic hypertension in nontransgenic and syn-hACE2 mice overexpressing ACE2 in neurons. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt treatment in nontransgenic mice led to significant increases in blood pressure, hypothalamic angiotensin II levels, inflammation, impaired baroreflex sensitivity, and autonomic dysfunction, as well as decreased hypothalamic ACE2 activity and expression, although these changes were blunted or prevented in syn-hACE2 mice. In addition, reduction of ACE2 expression and activity in the brain paralleled an increase in ACE2 activity in the cerebrospinal fluid of nontransgenic mice after deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt treatment and were accompanied by enhanced ADAM17 expression and activity in the hypothalamus. Chronic knockdown of ADAM17 in the brain blunted the development of hypertension and restored ACE2 activity and baroreflex function.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data provide the first evidence that ADAM17-mediated shedding impairs brain ACE2 compensatory activity, thus contributing to the development of neurogenic hypertension.

KEYWORDS:

angiotensin; autonomic dysfunction; baroreflex; central nervous system; gene therapy; hypertension; inflammation

PMID:
24014829
PMCID:
PMC4479408
DOI:
10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.113.301811
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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