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J Biosci Bioeng. 2014 Mar;117(3):278-84. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiosc.2013.08.005. Epub 2013 Sep 6.

Dynamic changes in brewing yeast cells in culture revealed by statistical analyses of yeast morphological data.

Author information

1
Department of Integrated Bioscience, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bldg. FSB-101, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8562, Japan.
2
Research Laboratories for Brewing, Kirin Brewery Company, Limited, 17-1 Namamugi 1-chome, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-8628, Japan.
3
Department of Integrated Bioscience, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bldg. FSB-101, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8562, Japan. Electronic address: ohya@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp.

Abstract

The vitality of brewing yeasts has been used to monitor their physiological state during fermentation. To investigate the fermentation process, we used the image processing software, CalMorph, which generates morphological data on yeast mother cells and bud shape, nuclear shape and location, and actin distribution. We found that 248 parameters changed significantly during fermentation. Successive use of principal component analysis (PCA) revealed several important features of yeast, providing insight into the dynamic changes in the yeast population. First, PCA indicated that much of the observed variability in the experiment was summarized in just two components: a change with a peak and a change over time. Second, PCA indicated the independent and important morphological features responsible for dynamic changes: budding ratio, nucleus position, neck position, and actin organization. Thus, the large amount of data provided by imaging analysis can be used to monitor the fermentation processes involved in beer and bioethanol production.

KEYWORDS:

Bottom-fermenting yeast; Budding profile; CalMorph; Cell morphology; Fermentation; Principal component analysis; Saccharomyces pastorianus

PMID:
24012106
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbiosc.2013.08.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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