Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Vet Intern Med. 2013 Nov-Dec;27(6):1354-61. doi: 10.1111/jvim.12187. Epub 2013 Sep 6.

The effect of feeding a renal diet on plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 concentrations in cats with stable azotemic chronic kidney disease.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, Hatfield, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) is a phosphatonin, which is increased in cats with azotemic CKD. Dietary phosphate restriction decreases FGF-23 concentrations in humans and rodents, but this relationship has not previously been examined in the cat.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the effect of feeding renal diet on plasma FGF-23 concentrations in cats with stable azotemic CKD.

ANIMALS:

Azotemic, client-owned cats (≥ 9 years); 33 cats ate renal diet (RD group) and 11 cats did not eat renal diet (comparator group) over 28-56 days.

METHODS:

Retrospective longitudinal study: Plasma FGF-23, PTH, and phosphate concentrations were measured at baseline and after 28-56 days. Cats in the RD group were classified as hyperphosphatemic (HP) or normophosphatemic (NP) based on the International Renal Interest Society targets for plasma phosphate concentration. Nonparametric tests were performed.

RESULTS:

In the HP group (n = 15), feeding renal diet was associated with a significant decrease in plasma phosphate (P = .001), PTH (P = .007), and FGF-23 (P = .008), but not creatinine concentrations (P = .91). In the NP group (n = 18), feeding renal diet was associated with a significant decrease in plasma FGF-23 (P = .006), but not phosphate (P = .48), PTH (P = .35), or creatinine concentrations (P = .10). No significant changes were seen in any parameters in the comparator group during the study period.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:

Feeding renal diet is associated with reductions in plasma FGF-23 concentrations in hyper- and normophosphatemic cats with stable azotemic CKD, suggesting that dietary phosphate restriction may enable cats with CKD to maintain normal plasma phosphate concentrations in association with lower plasma FGF-23 concentrations.

KEYWORDS:

Feline; Hyperparathyroidism; PTH; Phosphate

PMID:
24010686
DOI:
10.1111/jvim.12187
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center