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Perspect Clin Res. 2013 Jul;4(3):175-80. doi: 10.4103/2229-3485.115380.

Knowledge, attitude, and practices toward ayurvedic medicine use among allopathic resident doctors: A cross-sectional study at a tertiary care hospital in India.

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1
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 1st Floor Main building, Above Dean's office, Seth G.S. Medical College, KEM Hospital, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Ayurveda is most commonly practiced form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in India. There are very few studies showing the knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) of allopathic doctors about Ayurvedic drugs and its use.

AIMS:

The study was initiated to assess KAP toward Ayurvedic medicine use among allopathic resident doctors.

SETTINGS AND DESIGN:

Cross-sectional and prospective study.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

After obtaining permission from the Institutional Ethics Committee, allopathic resident doctors from clinical departments were approached personally. They were given pre-formed validated questionnaire to assess KAP toward Ayurvedic medicine use.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED:

Descriptive statistics.

RESULTS:

Allopathic residents had little knowledge about basic concepts of Ayurveda, that is, 'panchakarma' and 'tridosha'. Majority residents (99%) had no opportunity to learn basics of Ayurveda, but 67% residents prescribed Ayurvedic medicines to patients. However, many residents (76%) mentioned that cross practice should not be allowed due to lack of knowledge. One resident knew that cross-practice was not allowed by law. The commonly prescribed proprietary Ayurvedic medicines were Liv-52 (39%), Shatavari (13%), Cystone (12%) and common ailments for which these medicines prescribed were liver disorders (34%), arthritis (18%), cough and cold (13%), kidney stones (11%), and piles (10%). Nearly 76% residents felt incorporation of Ayurveda with modern medicine would attract more patients and at the same time most residents (92%) agreed that Ayurvedic medicines need scientific testing before use. Though 50% of the residents agreed for voluntary training in Ayurveda, 80% denied compulsory training. Nearly 63% residents recommended Ayurveda among all CAMs. Most of residents heard of Ayurveda from their colleagues.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study reveals that allopathic resident doctors had little knowledge about Ayurveda and Ayurvedic medicine use but engaged in prescription of Ayurvedic medicines. So some interventions should be taken to increase the knowledge and awareness of allopathic resident doctors about Ayurvedic medicine use.

KEYWORDS:

Allopathy; Ayurveda; and practices study; attitude; cross-practice; knowledge; residents

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