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Int J Audiol. 2013 Dec;52(12):849-54. doi: 10.3109/14992027.2013.822994. Epub 2013 Sep 5.

Characterizing the frequency tuning properties of air-conduction ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in healthy individuals.

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1
Department of Audiology, All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, Manasagangothri , Mysore, Karnataka , India.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Inconsistencies regarding frequency tuning of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP) prompted the present study to aim at characterizing frequency tuning of oVEMP in healthy individuals.

DESIGN:

Normative study.

STUDY SAMPLE:

The study was conducted to obtain oVEMP responses from 54 healthy individuals in age range of 18-30 years. The responses were acquired for tone-bursts at octave and mid-octave frequencies from 250 to 2000 Hz from the inferior oblique muscle using contralateral electrode placement. The frequencies were compared for amplitude and threshold.

RESULTS:

oVEMPs were present in 100% of individuals at or below the frequency of 1000 Hz. The responses had maximum amplitude and lowest thresholds at 500 Hz. There were at least two replicable peak-complexes namely n1-p1 and p1-n2. Both these complexes revealed tuning at 500 Hz. Comparison between the two peak-complexes revealed higher amplitudes and lower thresholds for p1-n2 complex.

CONCLUSIONS:

oVEMPs are tuned to 500 Hz for both peak-complexes, with p1-n2 being more robust. Future studies using the threshold of oVEMP may be better suited to use p1-n2 complex for this purpose, provided vestibular origin of the second complex is proved. Additionally, careful use of tuning property is recommended when evaluating pathological conditions.

PMID:
24007539
DOI:
10.3109/14992027.2013.822994
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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